Is having 100% renewable energy for a country feasible?

Clean technology 2cb880ed154ca8ec33aa84f10c3ddc8282b2161634dc63ebb1735db8a8e4c1a7 Clean Technology
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Eugene Preston
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
Clean technology 2cb880ed154ca8ec33aa84f10c3ddc8282b2161634dc63ebb1735db8a8e4c1a7 Renewable Energy
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Eugene Preston has answerd exceptionally unlikely

100% means all the time, every hour, through good weather years and bad ones. I do reliability studies that simply ask the question, is there enough capacity every hour to meet the demand. I recently gave a talk to ERCOT, the Electric Reliability Council of Texas pushing renewables to 75% penetration see http://www.ercot.com/content/wcm/key_documents_lists/108733/06._EGPpresentation.pdf for the presentation and also gave a video or the same talk to some university students on the same day. That video is posted here https://mediasite.aces.utexas.edu/UTMediasite/Play/22760892ae97482cad74a855bee208ad1d?catalog=132651a4-ec47-440e-ba27-334ffd9889f0&playFrom=32664&autoStart=true
ERCOT has quite a lot of wind power and energy, 20,000 MW in a 70,000 MW peaking system with about a 40,000 MW average demand for the year. We are just now beginning to add a lot of solar to our system. The simulations show that somewhere around 7000 to 14000 MW of solar we will have excess power and begin dumping excess energy at times much as California is having to do right now. So this is wasted energy. And we begin to waste this renewable energy at an early point in the conversion to renewables, maybe around 20% to 30% penetration. I haven't checked the exact value. In order to stop dumping this valuable energy we will need to store it. So I add storage to the model and it works fine. There is a table at the end of the presentation showing scenarios of different penetrations and how much storage is needed. At first the storage is useful for just moving energy to peak shaving. But as renewables pick up more and more of the load the peak shaving is satisfied and now renewables begin to pick up more hours. As you keep on adding more renewables and more storage pretty soon you are seeing renewables picking up nearly all the energy all the time. But there is a problem. Every once in a while you see energy shortages in renewables production. This is because the wind and solar just have low production days in energy. You already have enough storage to distribute the energy to when its needed. That's not the problem. The problem is that wind and solar and hydro just have times when they don't produce much energy across the entire state. If you miss a day of production in renewables you have to fire up the gas generators to fill in the demand. So when you run the reliability program I call RTS3 the program forces you to not retire all the gas. In fact you have to keep most of your fossil fuel capacity in standby to fill in when renewables fail to produce enough energy. So this right here prevents 100% conversion to renewables. What if we had really long term storage, like the equivalent of a grain silo? Suppose we could create some form of liquids such as a flow battery does where we could store large amounts of energy in these liquids and even store them for years. We could ride through the low production years with enough storage. But that technology is not yet invented. So until we invent long term storage for electric energy we are not going to be able to achieve 100% renewables. You can download my RTS3 model and run your own scenarios. I could even prepare for you the CAISO data from public sources. I intend to do just that as soon as I finish my NERC www.nerc.com study on the CAISO. They want to finish their report first before we go public. By the way the CAISO has a terrible reliability problem if there is an extended drought which reduces hydro production for years at a time. Hydro is a blessing and a curse. Its a blessing during rainy years and a curse in dry years. California had the driest years in 2013 - 2015 in the past 1200 years. The question is, when is the next drought, and what kind of resources do we need to keep working so we can insure the lights will stay on during severe droughts. Having some nuclear in the mix would make the system more reliable both capacity wise and energy wise as well as reduce CO2 emissions. So those are my comments. Please contact me at any time for modeling how we get off fossil fuels. We all have the same goal of getting off fossil fuels. My web page is http://egpreston.com . Gene Preston, PE PhD

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Yee-Chang Feng
about 2 months ago

Yee-Chang Feng from Taiwan says:
An alternative or better answer to the question may be available in my latest paper submitted to-
2018 Int’l Conference on Power, Energy and Mechanical Engineering (ICPEME 2018, www.icpeme.com/index.html), Barcelona, Spain, 5-7 Feb. 2018
Paper Title: A New Non-Intermittent Renewable Energy Generation Technology
To Avert Dark-Doldrums Low Production for Solar and Wind Power
Author: Yee-Chang Feng *
* Independent Energy Researcher/Inventor, Taichung, Taiwan E-mails: unipower@ms12.hinet.net; yeechangfeng@gmail.com

Abstract - This paper presents the concepts of the new technology to create a non-intermittent renewable energy generation system that can work alone, or can be integrated into hybrid grids of solar and wind power to protect it against ‘dark doldrums’ that is referred to as a time of very low solar and wind power production as what happened in several weeks last December and years before in Germany and thus some people argued that the German Energiewende (Energy Transition) could never be successful [1]. This renewable system has several or infinite subsidiary generation units in-tandem disposed in a common wind tunnel, using the wind tunnel’s air flow as common working fluid. Each unit works independently with its own air compressor, air turbine, heat pump, and generator. Wind tunnel is fully thermally insulated for minimum heat loss. Air compressor extracts air from its preceding unit’s turbine and thus renders the turbine’s outlet pressure P4 and outlet temperature T4 to descend. Lower T4 triggers the turbine to produce more output work which is proportional to turbine inlet/outlet air temperature difference ΔT34(=T3-T4) as T3 remains unchanged; therefore a net useful work is obtained as soon as the ΔT34 becomes larger. Heat pump carries heat energy from the external high- temperature source(s) to the low-temperature moving air (as the sink) in wind tunnel, so its coefficient of performance (COP) is very high and thus offsetting the energy extracted by the turbine. Heat source of the heat pumps is one of ambient air, waste heat, solar thermal, and geothermal, or a viable combination of these. This system can be deployed independently at remote sites apart from existing electric grids, working alone or being integrated into the local grid of solar and wind power and other power system(s) to avert low power output at ‘dark doldrums’. This is a zero-carbon-emission and fuel needless system, operating as a cold-thermal engine and using breakthrough and patented [2] technology to offer an efficacious climate solution for the crucial energy transition for the power network in need of non-intermittent electric grids.
[1] Prominent German economist Prof. Dr. Heiner Flassbeck: ’The End of the Energiewende ?’, 10 Jan., 2017, available at: http://energypost.eu/end-energiewende/ About H. Flassbeck, visit: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heiner_Flassbeck
[2] Yee-Chang Feng and Po-Lo Feng, ‘Clean Energy Generation System’, US Patent No. 9,255,493, Feb. 2, 2016